Dead man walking ethics essay

There is no wavering here. She believes what she believes and it extends across the board. She never seems to act rashly or contradict herself. I wonder how that would be? She extends her love and understanding to all whom she meets; the convicted as well as those who have to carry out the sentence, whether they believe in it or not; the victims and their families, and those who are actively in opposition to her. One thing that made Sister Prejean is a woman whose moral compass seems to be set. One thing that made me rethink the death penalty; she asserts that putting a prisoner to death is actually more expensive than keeping them incarcerated for life.

Dead man walking - Film analysis

I thought that was really interesting, because one of my main beliefs was that it was probably cheaper to put a prisoner to death than to keep him for the rest of his life. Sister Prejean says; "Public surveys indicate that support for the death penally drops significantly when the public is assured that murderers will remain behind bars for life. Someone is trying to kill him and this must rivet his energies on his own survival, not the pain of others. View 2 comments. Jul 25, Rebecca rated it really liked it Shelves: biographical , true-crime , memoirs.

No matter your current thoughts on the death penalty, you owe it to yourself to read this book with an open mind. I read it in the run-up to Easter , and would recommend it as perfect reading for the season. As I truly engaged with themes of guilt and retribution, I felt the reality of death row was brought home to me for the first time. Many of the men Prejean deals with in this book we would tend to dismiss as monsters, yet Jesus is the God who comes for the lost and the discounted, the Go No matter your current thoughts on the death penalty, you owe it to yourself to read this book with an open mind.

Many of the men Prejean deals with in this book we would tend to dismiss as monsters, yet Jesus is the God who comes for the lost and the discounted, the God who faces execution himself. The film, which conflates some of the characters and events of the book, is equally affecting.

The True Story Behind Dead Man Walking: A Moral Indictment of Capital Punishment (1999)

I saw it first, but it does not ruin the reading experience in any way. Jun 08, James Carter rated it did not like it. Dead Man Walking pretends to take a look at both sides of capital punishment but does not tell the full story of what actually happened to the victims. If the traumatic event doesn't convince her enough, I guess she should get the sainthood after all, and it will be just another example of how silly religion is.

For a change, how about coming into contact with death-row inmates who can barely speak English or put together a comprehensible string of words, have soulless eyes, and like to throw feces at people? Is she going to rationalize their behavior as something simplistic like "misunderstood children trapped in men's bodies? There are flaws with Prejean's logic whenever she tries to make an argument using scriptures from the bible or quoting crime statistics. By rationalizing her stand from the biblical viewpoint, she makes the classic mistake in terms of how words from the book must not be taken so literally because society has evolved over time.

(PDF) Themes of Virtue Ethics in "Dead Man Walking" | Kai Matthews - dredadanli.tk

That's exactly the point why religion is nothing but a man-made, money making enterprise because the Bible is meant to be the true word of God, yet there are so many mistakes, contradictions, logical problems, inconsistencies, etc. Hence, the whole religion thing falls apart right in its face and must be therefore discarded. As a result, she fudged the presentation by withholding that important statistic. No system is ever going to be perfect, and there will be mistakes; the most important thing to do is learn from them and not to repeat them.

It's the government's responsibility to make the necessary corrections and refine the system more, hence the countless of appeals in state and federal courts to ensure due process. As far as captial punishment goes, it's the just thing to do. What bothers me is that the process takes too long to get moving. To fix it is to create a separate court system that exclusively deals with death-row appeals and just speed them all up to be completed within several, not 20 to 30, years.

Yes, all people, regardless of their race and income, should feel the brunt of it.


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State- and federal-sponsored execution for crimes committed should be the truth of how real it is and needs to be promptly administered. People who kill may will kill again if they are allowed to live.

To put them down prevents any further murders, even if they occur in prisons. Otherwise, capital punishment will have lost all of its meaning. Victims may feel relief from the final resolution, but nothing will erase their loss or pain; at any rate, it's ultimately disappointing that life has dealt them a harsh blow like this. Sister Helen Prejean should learn to refrain from filling in words of what other people might be thinking. That's just a big no-no, especially in something serious that deals with victims of death-row cases. As for the facts of the case, when you read her account of what happened, the words won't really hit you; it's just impactless retelling of the case.

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When you read Detective Michael Varnado's book Victims of Dead Man Walking , you will truly feel the words as if you were there and understand why the death penalty was sought. The pictures of deceased Faith Hathaway tell an overpowering tale of how brutally raped and murdered she was. Elsewhere, Sister Helen Prejean failed to mention that the vote was 11 to 1 in favor of death for the other accomplice which is why he got life instead.

Ever the classic liberal, she is merely interested in using political rhetoric, away from the brutality of crimes so to present her side through a narrow viewpoint, to make a case against capital punishment because they are, after all, human beings who made mistakes. Note: I just finished reading Dead Family Walking. There are shocking revelations from that book which weren't mentioned anywhere else. Sister Helen Prejean was planning to ditch her faith and marry Elmo Sonnier who later admitted that he was using her to escape the death penalty. Also, she went behind her Mother Superior's back by forcing the church to open up a plot for him and having all the necessary papers signed; when this was found out, it became too late to reverse the process.

During Sonnier's execution, Millard Farmer provoked Mr. Borque to get him angry by claiming that he didn't want Sonnier dead, which wasn't true in the first place, in the hopes of rendering the ongoing execution null and void on technical grounds. Sister Helen Prejean was making so much noise during the proceeding that she was ordered by the warden to immediately leave the premises afterwards. As for the last night, when Sonnier was claimed to have said something like "the whole thing stinks bad," Sister Helen Prejean's account of how it went down in her book never happened, and she made it all up; she was actually at the governor's office in Baton Rouge with Farmer, not Angola with Sonnier.

All in all, before or after you read Dead Man Walking , be sure to read Victims of Dead Man Walking and Dead Family Walking and judge for yourself who is really telling the full, truthful story of what really happened. Although it did take me a bit to read this book, it was a quick read.

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Dead Man Walking: The Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty That Sparked a National Debate

It's the perfect companion to Just Mercy , a snapshot of the death penalty in the 80s and 90s but from within the time period itself. It's a heavy book at points, especially with some graphic mention to death and how adamant pro-death penalty believers were, but Prejean pulls no punches at looking at a corrupt justice system that Although it did take me a bit to read this book, it was a quick read.

It's a heavy book at points, especially with some graphic mention to death and how adamant pro-death penalty believers were, but Prejean pulls no punches at looking at a corrupt justice system that executed criminals but treats the victims just as horribly. Dead Man Walking is harrowing but ultimately hopeful that perhaps some light can be found at the end of a tunnel. It will just take time. Helen Prejean, C. I don't say this as a condemnation, just as something I was never able to forget while reading Dead Man Walking. This is a woman making an argument; her goal is to persuade. As a reader, I was always able to feel her persuading me as I read, and even though I agree with her--the death penalty as practiced in the American criminal justice system is an abomination and a farce--I had to keep reminding myself not to dig in my heels just because I don't Sr.

As a reader, I was always able to feel her persuading me as I read, and even though I agree with her--the death penalty as practiced in the American criminal justice system is an abomination and a farce--I had to keep reminding myself not to dig in my heels just because I don't like being persuaded of things. Which is also not to say that she is not extremely persuasive.

Sister Helen is an excellent storyteller, and she is always careful to keep the other side of her story in mind: the Bourques and the LeBlancs as well as Pat Sonnier, the Harveys as well as Robert Lee Willie. She's perfectly open about her own rhetorical purpose, and she's willing to show the people who don't agree with her as being good and morally upright people who are able to turn their daughter's horrible death into purpose that is not simply about supporting the death penalty, but about advocating for the rights of the families of murder victims. She's sometimes a little disingenuous, but I never felt she was dishonest.

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The movie conflates Pat Sonnier and Robert Lee Willie, which I think does a disservice to the moral complexity of the book. Sonnier, who expresses remorse and accepts responsibility for his terrible crime, who loves his brother fiercely enough to forgive him and in a sense to die for him, who is open to and accepting of Sister Helen's message. Who is enough of a man unlike Willie, the narrative suggests to drop his machismo and admit his emotions.

Sonnier, who thanks Sister Helen for loving him, is just about the perfect poster child for her purpose. Willie is not. He is not remorseful; he shifts responsibility to the other guy. Sonnier, in something that was either a clusterfuck or a very shrewd manipulation on Eddie Sonnier's part, confessed; Willie says consistently that it was all Vaccaro's fault, that Vaccaro did it.

The closest he gets to admitting culpability is saying that he shouldn't have followed Vaccaro's lead.